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Feb. 1st, 2003

Goddamnit. This is the kind of repulsive shit that has made me oppose ANY funding whatsoever to NASA. They take billions and billions and yet it's not enough to make sure that they don't kill seven people. When will they fucking learn.. SHUT THIS FUCKING BLOAT DOWN before I see challenger III in another 8 years.

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( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
just_the_ash
Feb. 1st, 2003 09:51 am (UTC)
The Columbia was old equipment. Not everybody would even drive a CAR that old these days. Whatever they're spending the money on, it sure hasn't been shuttle maintenance. I bet it turns out to be something stupid like the O-ring that was responsible for the Challenger. And I'm quite sure we'll all quickly be fed up with the various conspiracy theories (oh no, there was an Israeli on board, is Al-Qaeda in space? -- that kind of thing).
shockwave77598
Feb. 1st, 2003 10:52 am (UTC)
People spend billions on cars, and still we lose 58000 people a year on the freeways.

Spacetravel is not safe. It cannot be made safe. NOTHING can be made safe, no matter how much money and work you put into it. You can die in your home from a fire, from Radon, from an earthquake, from a flash flood... Anyone who thinks anything can be made perfectly safe is deluding himself.

We should find what the failure was and correct it, then press on. We should also take new technologies into account and redesign the blasted program and get the Space Planes flying, as we've tried to do twice (to the tune of billions of dollars) only to cancel halfway through.

There will be changes, but we must not abandon space. If we do, and the doomsday asteroid appears and we can't get up there to deflect it and save the Earth, then we deserve to perish for our shortsightedness.

It's a sad day, yes. I'm still very much in shock myself. But there's too much at stake for the future to let this stop us.
floyd_mephit
Feb. 1st, 2003 01:42 pm (UTC)
Re:
Of course space travel not safe. I really don't have any problem whatsoever with people dying in crashes. I'm actually glad they do. What angers me is that they taxed me and everyone else so many billions of dollars first. They could have used their budget in a more efficient manner, but it's just taken for granted that NASA is an end, not a means; therefore the government has no problem letting them piss my money away on things that don't need to be funded and supplement it by flying a goddamned 20 YEAR OLD SHUTTLE.


I'm all for space exploration...in 20 or 50 years. AFTER we've solved our more important domestic problems. AFTER we've learned to take off our 'world police' badge and stay the hell out of countries that don't speak English. AFTER we wean our energy suckling instinct away from the bitter tit of foreign controlled oil.

We have the wrong priorities. WRONG.
kellic
Feb. 1st, 2003 10:56 am (UTC)
What about the X-11 that was to replace the shuttle. Hell it handles heat in a totally diff manner. But budget cuts and more budget cuts basically killed that initiative.

The government isn't giving the funding to NASA that is should. Keep in mind that how many probes and satellites have we put up there in the past with no problems but in the last 15 year with budgets being cut what are we getting? Failed missions. Is this just chance? I don’t think so. NASA is running on a shoe string budget compared to the past. You need to cut corners somewhere but the outcome ends up being the same. Failed missions and finally the shit hit the fan and it wasn’t hardware that was lost this time.....
floyd_mephit
Feb. 1st, 2003 01:48 pm (UTC)
Re:
NASA had no business executing a multi-million dollar space shuttle launch after budget cuts like they had. They must feel obligated to rocket some piece of outdated circuitry into orbit every so often or they might look vestigial in a failing economy.

Corners wouldn't have to be cut if they'd sit still for a few years and let their budget money grow or invest it on replacement technologies instead of spending it on repairing flight vehicles that belong in the Smithsonian.
( 5 comments — Leave a comment )